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« Football for Fifth Graders | Main | Looking at "Unconditional Election" »

24 August 2009

Comments

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Steve Ganz

I'm with Michael on this one. Like to see how you grow your tulips.

Stephen Grant

Michael, I think you mis-speak the implications..."You will love and serve me whether you like it or not; and you will like it because I will make you. So, in essence one goes from no choice to no choice." I do not think this is what Calvin believed or taught....

I hope over the next several posts to answer your question by working through "TULIP", and my understanding of how it works... and what makes me "reformed". I may find as I do this that I disagree with Calvin. That is OK to me. But I am tired of people who do not identify themselves as reformed or people that are hyper-actively reformed defining the reformed positions for the rest of us who simply want to be sane, sensible, and true to Scripture's teaching.

Michael Morkve

Great statement, one I think we can all agree on. However, I don't think it gets to the point of classic Calvinistic/'Reformed'belief systems. The point isn't whether sin has infiltrated every part of our being but what the implications for that are. The Calvinist/Reformed says it has so darkened the waters that there is no possibility of choice on the part of man and thus any reconciliation is a direct result of God's irresitable choice. 'You will love and serve me whether you like it or not; and you will like it because I will make you. So, in essence one goes from no choice to no choice.

My point here was not to argue against Calvinistic/Reformed beliefs but simply to say all conservative's agree with what you said Calvinist's and Arminianist's, the full gambit of colors. What they do not agree on is the implications. What, then, I would ask makes you 'reformed'?

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